Keywords

Competence, Commitment, Readiness And Information Technology Programs

Introduction

A school which passes the acid test of accreditation could therefore be a step in the miles journey towards a reengineered academic system with high quality outputs, (Colinares, 2002). Being ready is both a state and a process. Readiness is connected with change, yet there is little understanding of this construct. The process of readiness involves recognizing the need to change, weighing the costs and benefits and, when benefits outweigh costs, planning for change. When they experience a high degree of readiness they report less anger, less depression, and view their state in a more positive light. In contrast, when they experience a low degree of readiness they report feeling depressed, afraid and vulnerable in the face of change [3].

Readiness to accreditation has indicators. In the case of information technology accreditation readiness, the faculty competence and commitment are a big consideration.

Commitment refers to the person’s attachment to work and organization. Work commitment plays an vital part in the performance of every individual. Buchanan [1] emphasizes the value of commitment by stating that the importance of commitment becomes precious or significant than one considers that it has positive contribution to one’s health and success as in teaching. Indeed, teachers who are obviously committed tend to do their jobs effectively [6].

On the other hand, educators’ competency in computer technology is importatnt if they are to be successful instructional teachers as they use and share this competency to their students. Certainly, this computer technology foundation is necessary for all teachers and students [9]. According to Wanocott [12], information and communications technology (ICT) has become a influential technology means in delivering technical vocational education programs around the globe. Before that, in 1998, McKenzie also concluded that computer and information technology would be used widely in delivery the technical/ vocational education programs in the future, in response to technology changes, particularly in the educational system. Many researchers support using computers in educational activities. Zirkle [13] stated that new technologies such as a computer promise abundant education experiences. Goldberg [7] also supported the argument. He confirmed that students who were taught using both traditional methods and the internet performed better than those who were only exposed to the traditional methods. Day, Raven, and Newman [4] also found that students who were taught using computer application with a laboratory achieved a higher level than those students who were taught using the traditional classroom approach.

Wonacott [12] believes that computer technology and computer-based technologies has become a powerful teaching tool for technology instructors. With the high quality of graphical-user interface, high speed processing and affordability, computer use in preparing the workforce has come to age. The educational software designer is now able to design and develop multidimensional educational software that includes high quality graphics, stereo sound, and real time interaction. Engstrom (1981) identifies competencies that the teacher and school staff should have to ensure they can work effectively in schools.

Accreditation is the most widely accepted parameter in the evaluation of a course, a school or a university.

The success or failure of any educational program or curriculum depends largely on the teachers’ competence as direct implementers. Equally important to teaching competence is the teachers’ commitment to his profession and to the organization. Competence will not work as long as teachers have commitment to teach.

Regular evaluation of faculty competence and commitment is a must to be always ready for accreditation.

Statement of the Problem

  • What is the level of competence of faculty members of non-accredited Information Technology programs of SUCs in Region VI as an entire group, and when classified as to age, sex, educational qualification, length of teaching experience, academic rank, and location of school?
  • What is the level of commitment of faculty members of non-accredited IT programs of SUCs in Region VI as an entire group, and when classified as to age, sex, educational qualification, length of teaching experience, academic rank, and location of school?
  • Is there a significant relationship between Readiness for Accreditation and Level of Competent of IT Faculty Members?
  • Is there a significant relationship between Readiness for Accreditation and Level of Commitment of IT Faculty Members ?

Materials and Methods

This study utilized the descriptive-correlational type of research. According to Subong (2005), descriptive research involves data collection in order to test the stated hypotheses or answer questions concerning the current status of the subject of the study. Correlation studies, on the other hand, are designed to determine the relationship of each other in the population of interest (Sevilla, 1992). This study involved collecting data to be used in determining whether, and to what degree or relationship exists between computer technology competencies, commitment and their relationship to readiness for accreditation. To determine the competence, commitment and readiness for accreditation of respondents, the researcher employed three (3) standardized data-gathering instruments revised at certain degree to suit the needs of the present study. The instruments used for competence were adopted from Perception of Computer Technology Competencies of Saud (2005). The instruments used for commitment were adopted from Administrators’ Commitment of Libutaque [10]. The instrument used for readiness to accreditation were adopted from Preliminary Survey Instrument Area II Faculty of AACCUP,Inc. (2011). To determine the respondents’ level of computer technology competence, the investigator utilized the Perception of Computer Technology Competencies (Saud, 2005). This data-gathering instrument consists of eight sections – Section 1. Computer Operation Skills (13 items), Section 2. Set-up, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting (10 items), Section 3. Word Processing/Introductory Desktop Publishing (10 items), Section 4. Spreadsheet/Graphing (11 items), Section 5. Database (8 items), Section 6. Networking (6 units), Section 7. Telecommunications (18 items), and Section 8. Media Communications (10 items). This standardized and published test was taken at face value. To score the test, the researcher totaled the numerical values of the respondents’ responses for each construct. To determine the respondents’ level administrators’ commitment, the investigator utilized the Administrators’ Commitment (Libutaque, 2003). This data-gathering instrument consists of 30 items that drawn out the level of the administrators’ commitment. The questionnaire on commitment used the 5-point Likert scale. According to Catane, 2000, Likert scale is made up of series of opinion statements about some issues and the response indicates the degree of agreement or disagreement.

Result and Discussion

Level of Competence of IT Faculty Members of NonAccredited Information Technology Programs of SUCs in Region VI

The findings revealed that the entire group of IT faculty members in the Region VI had very high competence (M = 4.5508, SD = .4490).

When this IT faculty members were classified as to age, the young (30 years old below) (M = 4.5198, SD = .4221) and the old (above 30 years old) (M = 4.5870, SD = .4791) had very high competence.

When classified as to sex, the male (M = 4.5871, SD=.4242) and the female (M = 4.4907, SD = .4852) had very high competence.

When classified as to educational qualification, Master’s Degree holder (M = 4.6438, SD = .3363) and Baccalaureate Degree holder (M = 4.5147, SD = .4801) had very high competence.

When classified as to length of teaching experience, those with long (above 8 years) (M = 4.6018, SD = .5647) and those with Short (8 years and below) (M = 4.5329, SD = .4022) had very high competence.

When classified as to academic rank, the Part Time Instructors (M = 4.4821, SD = .4251), Instructors (M = 4.6079, SD = .4161) and Professors (M = 4.5862, SD = .6915) had very high competence.

Finally, as to the location of school, the Aklan (M = 4.4985, SD = .5592), Antique (M = 4.5260, SD = .3928), Capiz (M = 4.8200, SD = .1488), Guimaras (M = 4.8240, SD = .0564), Iloilo (M = 4.5635, SD = .4895), Negros Occ. (M = 4.4613, SD = .4030) had a very high competence.

Table 1

Level of Competence of IT Faculty Members of Non-Accredited Information Technology Programs of SUCs in Region

Category No. of Respondents Mean Description SDSD
A.Entire Group 154 4.5508 Very High 0.449
B.Age
Young (30 years old below) 83 4.5198 Very High 0.4221
Old (above 30 years old) 71 4.587 Very High 0.4791
C.Sex
Male 96 4.5871 Very High 0.4242
Female 58 4.4907 Very High 0.4852
D. Educational Qualification
Master’s Degree 40 4.6438 Very High 0.3363
Baccalaureate Degree 113 4.5147 Very High 0.4801
E.. Length of Teaching Experience
Long (above 8 years) 40 4.6018 Very High 0.5647
Short(8 years and below) 114 4.5329 Very High 0.4022
F.Academic Rank
Part time Instructor 70 4.4821 Very High 0.4251
Instructor 70 4.6079 Very High 0.4161
Professor 14 4.5862 Very High 0.6915
G.Location of School
Aklan 13 4.4985 Very High 0.5592
Antique 25 4.526 Very High 0.3928
Capiz 7 4.82 Very High 0.1488
Guimaras 5 4.824 Very High 0.0564
Iloilo 73 4.5635 Very High 0.4895
Negros Occidental 32 4.5508 Very High 0.449

Scale Description
4.21 – 5.00 Very high
3.41 – 4.20 High
2.61 – 3.40 Moderate
1.81 – 2.60 Fair
1.00 – 1.80 Poor

Level of Commitment of IT Faculty Members of Non-Accredited IT programs of SUCs in Region VI

The findings revealed that the entire group of IT faculty members in the Region VI had a very high commitment (M = 4.6748, SD = .3265).

When the faculty members were classified as to age, the young (30 years old below) (M = 4.6123, SD = .3440) and the old (above 30 years old) (M = 4.7479, SD = .2904) had a very high commitment.

When classified as to sex, the male (M = 4.6666, SD = .3166) and the female (M = 4.6884, SD = .3446) had very high commitment.

When classified as to educational qualification, Master’s Degree holder (M = 4.7210, SD = .2957) and Baccalaureate Degree holder (M = 4.6565, SD = .3371) had very high commitment.

When classified as to length of teaching experience, those with long (above 8 years) (M = 4.7688, SD = .2748) and those with Short (8 years and below)(M = 4.4618, SD = .3377) had very high commitment.

When classified as to academic rank, the Part Time Instructors (M = 4.5813, SD = .3491), Instructors (M = 4.7384, SD = .2965) and Professors (M = 4.8108, SD = .2217) had very high commitment.

Finally, as to their location of school, Aklan (M = 4.6323, SD = .3577), Antique (M = 4.5704, SD = .4367), Capiz (M = 4.7043, SD = .2002), Guimaras (M = 4.7260, SD = .1839), Iloilo (M = 4.7307, SD = .2963), Negros Occ. (M = 4.6334, SD = .3106) had very high commitment.

Table 2

Level of Commitment of IT Faculty Members of Non-Accredited IT Programs of SUCs in Region VI

Category No. of Respondents Mean Description SDSD
A.Entire Group 154 4.6748 Very High 0.3265
B.Age
Young (30 years old below) 83 4.6123 Very High 0.344
Old (above 30 years old) 71 4.7479 Very High 0.2904
C.Sex
Male 96 4.6666 Very High 0.3166
Female 58 4.6884 Very High 0.3446
D.Educational Qualification
Master’s Degree 40 4.721 Very High 0.2957
Baccalaureate Degree 113 4.6565 Very High 0.3371
E.Length of Teaching Experience
Long (above 8 years) 40 4.7688 Very High 0.2748
Short(8 years and below) 114 4.6418 Very High 0.3377
F.Academic Rank
Part time Instructor 70 4.5813 Very High 0.3491
Instructor 70 4.7384 Very High 0.2965
Professor 14 4.8108 Very High 0.2217
G.Location of School
Aklan 13 4.6323 Very High 0.3577
Antique 25 4.5704 Very High 0.4367
Capiz 7 4.7043 Very High 0.2002
Guimaras 5 4.726 Very High 0.1839
Iloilo 73 4.7307 Very High 0.2963
Negros Occidental 32 4.6334 Very High 0.3106

Scale Description
4.22 – 5.00 Very high
3.41 – 4.20 High
2.61 – 3.40 Moderate
1.81 – 2.60 Fair
1.00 – 1.80 Poor

Relationship Between the Level of Readiness for Accreditation and Level of Competence of IT Faculty Members

Using the Pearson’s r as inferential statistics, the relationship between level of readiness for accreditation and the level of competence of IT faculty members was looked into. The findings revealed that no significant correlation existed as shown by a Pearson’s r of -.075 and two-tailed probability of .687 which was greater than the set of 0.05 level of significance.

Table 3

Relationship between Readiness for Accreditation and Level of Competent of IT Faculty Members

Pearson’s r “2-tailed Probability” Decision
Accreditation Readiness
-0.075 0.687 Not Significant
Competence

Relationship Between the Level of Readiness for Accreditation and Level of Commitment of IT Faculty Members

Using the Pearson’s r as inferential statistics, the relationship between level of readiness for accreditation and the level of commitment of IT faculty members was looked into. The findings revealed that no significant correlation existed as shown by a Pearson’s r of .104 and two-tailed probability of .579 which was greater than the set of 0.05 level of significance.

Table 4

Relationship between Readiness for Accreditation and Level of Commitment of IT Faculty Members

Pearson’s r “2-tailed Probability” Decision
Accreditation Readiness
0.104 0.579 Not Significant
Commitment

Conclusion and Innovation

The level of competence of IT faculty members of nonaccredited Information Technology programs of SUCs in Region VI as an entire group was very high. The level of commitment of IT faculty members of non-accredited information technology programs of SUCs in Region VI as an entire group was very high. Finally, there was no significant relationship between the level of readiness for accreditation and level of competence; between the level of readiness for accreditation and level of commitment. State universities and colleges shall grant full-time scholarship to faculty. Financial assistance should likewise be extended. This will encourage faculty to go on graduate studies by helping younger and part time instructor to become permanent in academic rank and persuade them to be committed in their work which will eventually improve the faculty profile of each campus and hopefully to uplift the teacher profile in an institution.